White House Easter egg rolls of the past

Good morning, TexMessagers! Are your kids still bouncing off the walls from a severe overdose of Easter candy? Try carrots next year to better imitate the Easter bunny.

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The White House published a photo album on Facebook of the White House easter egg rolls from the past.

Feel free to take a look at our photo gallery to embark on a brief, but interesting, history of former egg rolls.

White House Easter Egg Rolls from the Past
All dressed up for the Easter Egg Roll in 1898. President Rutherford B. Hayes started the tradition in 1878. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
A view of the White House South Lawn during the Easter Egg Roll of 1901. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)

Crowds fill the South grounds for the 1903 Easter Egg Roll. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
Children dance around the maypole at an Easter Egg Roll in the 1920s. The event was cancelled from 1917-1920, during WW1 (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
Annie E. McMichael Gamble and Carrie A. McMichael Davis at the Easter Egg Roll in 1920. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
Children share a drink at the Easter Egg Roll in 1922. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
Warren Sonnemann holds the prize basket during the 1923 event. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
Families gather on the South grounds for 1923 Easter Egg Roll. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
A young girl feeds candy to a stuffed rabbit in 1929. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt joins the festivities in 1939. The Egg Roll was cancelled in 1943-45 during WW 2 for rationing. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
President Eisenhower brought back the tradition in 1953 following extensive renovations to the White House; in 1956, 6,000 people attended. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
Energetic children play during the 1963 Easter Egg Roll. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
Children pushing their eggs down the South Lawn during the 1966 Easter Egg Roll. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
Some young girls are all dressed up for the Easter Egg Roll in 1967. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)
Guests enjoy the beautiful weather at the 1982 Easter Egg Roll. The Reagans introduced the now-signature wooden eggs the year before. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)

Bundled up children roll their eggs enjoy the festivities in 1994. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)

In 2002, a child rolls an Easter egg down the White House South Lawn. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)

Children participate in activities at the annual Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn. (Courtesy of the White House Facebook)

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